Decoding the first ever South Asian New York Fashion Week (SANYFW): The Main Headliners

Last week was the holy grail— New York Fashion Week, held between September 9 to September 14, filling our feeds with the launch of some gorgeous collections, satisfying every fashion, beauty, and even Web3 enthusiast alike. Fashion Week this year saw the uprising of a cultural reset with the launch of South Asian New York Fashion Week, held from September 8 to September 14. Let's dive deep into what the Fashion Week entailed!


In the next few days, we’ll be covering the different shows that took place, starting with the two primary headliners.


Decoding SANYFW:


Getting into the basics: What is SANYFW?

South Asian New York Fashion Week, SANYFW, South Asian Fashion

SANYFW was a step toward providing South Asian designers from across the globe a to showcase their skills and craftsmanship with a platform in one of the leading fashion capitals of the world— New York City. The initiative boosted the South Asian fashion culture, with runway shows presenting streetwear, sustainability, menswear, traditional, bridal, and Indo-Western styles. Like other Fashion Weeks, this too piqued the interest of several influencers, celebrities, icons, and all those who are design, fashion, and culture enthusiasts. Hosted around Manhattan, the Fashion Week had Nomi Ansari and Mayyur Girotra as the headliners, following other established and emerging designers/design houses like Bedi NYC, Recover Season, Jinashali, Rivesse, Margi etc., marking their debut at the Fashion Week. They even presented other artisans, craftspeople, jewellers, and more, providing a space for all!


Photo Credits: Sukhmani Kaur (@sukiphotography__)


The Headliners of SANYFW:


Mayyur Girotra

South Asian New York Fashion Week, SANYFW, South Asian Fashion
Mayyur Girotra

Heavy research and visiting several heritage Indian sites were where Mayyur started his journey in fashion, taking inspiration from historical art for his styles. The timeless collections blend classy and edgy, preserving the legacy of Indian crafts and textiles. Several celebrities and influencers have donned his designs, making him a true stimulant to the fashion space. For Fashion Week, his collection of choice was a combination of illustrious couture pieces and intricate textiles from South Asia— Zamani as the name. It features opulent looks and various Indian craftsmanship, nailing the melting pot attribute of Indians to the T with this range. One could spot black and white with splashes of bright colours representing the Indian culture through the line showcased at SANYFW.


Photo credits: Misha, Zeeshan Shabbir, Shantanu


Nomi Ansari

South Asian New York Fashion Week, SANYFW, South Asian Fashion, Nomi Ansari
Nomi Ansari

Nomi Ansari Studio has four prominent brands under its banner: Nomi Ansari Brides, Nomi Ansari Occasion Wear, Nomi Ansari Menswear, and Bubbles, a dedicated line for little girls. The label, established in 2001, houses garments curated with finesse and finish, where attention to detail, colour contrasts, delicate zardozi work, and crystal embellishments work as a trademark in the signature designs. The limited-edition range of ready-to-wear is available globally at multi-label boutiques. The runway saw the awe-worthy works of the Pakistan-based designer in the form of traditional wear with commendable intricate details.


Photo Credits: SANYFW and Nomi Ansari Instagram


The Future of Fashion

South Asian New York Fashion Week, SANYFW, South Asian Fashion
The Future of Fashion

Like the NYFW, even SANYFW saw the introduction of the Web3 with NFT drops by designers like Nomi Ansari, Untitled by Nikita, AKS Mathur, and Aara by Sana. It was a trend-setting event with designers bridging the gap between the tech and fashion worlds.


We cannot wait to see what else the fashion world hold when it comes to Web3. With other shows, like the Lakmé Fashion Week taking place in October from 12-16, it will be interesting to see if they too test the waters with Web3.0.


Photo Credits: SANYFW Instagram